Story Pitches

SourceURL:file://localhost/Users/Taylor/Documents/INTERNATIONAL%20REPORTING%20STORY%20PITCHES.doc

Letters@newsweek.com

April 25, 2011

No time for hard crime

 

Dear Letters@newsweek.com:

 

South Sudan is a great place to be a pedophile, if you’re into that sort of thing.

That’s because the crime often goes unpunished by police. My partner, (now located in Democratic Republic of Congo), said that a guard for her humanitarian work delivering seeds in South Sudan during the rainy season had been to prison in 2009 for impregnating a young girl, a feat he’s accomplished six times, yet he’s been working for the Food Security program for months.

Crafting a country means more than writing a constitution. It means controlling your people and keeping them safe from violence, so I think a 1,500-word profile of a prison in South Sudan after July 1 would resonate well with your readership.

A government cannot effectively control its people if those that fill the prisons should be freed, while those that reek havoc outside its walls walk free. Those that are inside the prisons are often treated inhumanely.  South Sudan has been debating what to do with its prisons since a speedy building period after the civil war. I think watching the Southern Sudan Prisons Service’s actions in its first few months will go a long way in unveiling the future new state.

As a freelance journalist, I’ve covered news for a regional weekly in southwestern Montana, the Big Sky Weekly, lacrosse for MCLA magazine and sports for the Montana Kaimin. I supplemented studies at The University of Montana School of Journalism with creative writing and media arts courses and know how to use a pen and camera. I now wish to take my talents into the African continent, which has in large part lacked in news coverage.

Story Development Coordinator
National Geographic
1145 17th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Fax: +1 202 457 8215

April 26, 2011

Dearest Story Development Coordinator:

Imagine 1.3 million antelope together across a country. Now imagine if that same group of antelope could provide a country with wealth, food and water.

It’s not hard to imagine the government of South Sudan mismanaging the second largest wildlife migration in the world, but it’s something not to be ignored.

The population was caught in the crossfire of the Second Sudanese Civil War (from 1983-2005), but conservationists estimate that most of the animals are still around, leaving their management in the hands of the new country.

The government in 2006 said it would do what it could to protect its wildlife, but that is yet to be seen. When the country splits on July 1, 2011, future management of wildlife will be left up to the Government of South Sudan.

The Wildlife Conservation Society has said it would like to work with the GOSS to establish wildlife areas that would benefit the country through tourism dollars. I’d like to follow their efforts to work with the South Sudan government and write a 1,500-word feature on the latest.

As a freelance journalist, I’ve covered news for a regional weekly in southwestern Montana, the Big Sky Weekly, lacrosse for MCLA magazine and sports for the Montana Kaimin. I supplemented studies at The University of Montana School of Journalism with creative writing and media arts courses and know how to use a pen and camera. I now wish to take my talents into the African continent, which has in large part lacked in news coverage.

Civil War Times Story Idea
19300 Promenade Drive
Leesburg, VA 20176-6500

April 25, 2011

Dear Civil War Times Story Idea:

There was a time when the people in the Southern part of a country fought the people from the North.

The North was powerful and rich. Its government’s pockets were lined with cash from the South, and it fought with military blitzes and burned villages to kill the southerners.

Much like the American Civil War, the Sudan Civil War (1983–2005) involved differing groups of people that shared the same land border. The Sudan People’s Liberation Army fought against the Government of Sudan.

The conflicts between the Christians tribes of the South and the Arabs of the North met at the border of the two, near Abyei in South Kurdufan. The loss of life during this war, known as the Second Sudanese Civil War, was an estimated 1.9 million people, and many were civilians.

I’d like to travel from Juba, where I’ll be stationed during my trip to Sudan, to Abyei in search of a family that lost members both in the North and South. It would be interesting to parallel the wars and their outcomes and consequences, which I think fits your readers’ collective tastes, in a 2,000-word non-fiction narrative story.

As a freelance journalist, I’ve covered news for a regional weekly in southwestern Montana, the Big Sky Weekly, lacrosse for MCLA magazine and sports for the Montana Kaimin. I supplemented studies at The University of Montana School of Journalism with creative writing and media arts courses and know how to use a pen and camera. I now wish to take my talents into the African continent, which has in large part lacked in news coverage.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s